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Bottle Batching

DESIGNED FOR COCKTAILS

Whether you’re a professional bartender looking to increase your bar’s efficiency, or a home bartender who wants to be ready for friends coming over to avoid being stuck making cocktails all night, we have the recipes and techniques you need.

Whatever the reason, everyone who enjoys good drinks needs this guide in their life. Maybe you just want a perfect cocktail chilling in the fridge, ready for you to sip and enjoy when it takes your fancy.

select your cocktail

Dry Martini

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The biggest misconception about the Dry Martini is that it’s a tough drink and you have to be ‘brave’ or a ‘seasoned drinker’ to attempt to drink one. However, that’s really not true, as long as you stick to a few simple but vital rules. The best possible gin, Fords Gin for example! Good quality and fresh Dry Vermouth. The perfect amount of dilution. A lack of dilution is usually the reason why people decide that the Martini is not for them. Water is essential to not only soften the heat of alcohol in stirred cocktails like the Martini but to also unlock all the flavors carried in the gin’s alcohol. When it comes to this batched recipe, you know it will be perfectly made every time because the ‘dilution’ is added as water, not melted into the drink by stirring ice. Beyond this, time in the bottle to rest allows the molecules to interact with each other and will further create a smoother, more rounded Martini experience. So, all you have to do is measure accurately and serve it very cold.

Step 1 ADD FORDS GIN

Fill to the top of the bottom measuring line, (Tippy top of measuring line, just above the 375ml measuring line).

Step 2 ADD DRY VERMOUTH

Fill to the middle of the bottle’s waist.

Step 3 ADD WATER

Fill to the ‘fill line’ on the neck of the bottle and put the lid on.

Serving Instructions Roll bottle end-over-end to mix, taste test & chill.

Pour your ice cold Dry Martini straight from the bottle into a cocktail glass. Garnish as required with a twist, olive or leave naked (no garnish).

Negroni

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A drink that was once more of a bartender’s curiosity, this red, bittersweet little drink has become one of the most popular cocktails in the world. As you may well know, it even has its own week!

The history of this drink’s creation is confusing, other than to say it was most likely created by someone called Negroni!

As a cocktail made of three ingredients of equal parts, along with water to open up its flavors and bring balance. You’ve made a great choice of gin, but close attention must also be paid to the bitter aperitivo and vermouth you choose. The flavor nuances of your choices here, will have a huge impact on the final drink.

Step 1 ADD FORDS GIN

Fill to the TOP of the 6oz line The liquid level should sit on top of the line, not in line with it

Step 2 ADD BITTER APERITIVO

Fill to the TOP of the 12oz line

Step 3 ADD SWEET VERMOUTH

Fill to just over half-way between the 500ml line and 20oz line

Step 4 ADD WATER

Fill to the ‘fill line’ on the neck of the bottle and put the lid on

Serving Instructions Roll bottle end-over-end to mix, taste test & chill.

Pour your chilled Negroni into a lowball glass with ice, garnish with orange slices and serve.

20th Century

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Essentially a variation on the Corpse Reviver No.2, this classic recipe was first put into print in William J. Tarling’s, Cafe Royal Cocktail Book of 1937. Tarling was head bartender at the Cafe Royal and this book was a glimpse into the cocktail offer in London bars between the wars. He both wrote and compiled the recipes in it, and this 20th Century was credited to another British Bartender by the name of C.A.Tuck. Tuck had named the recipe after the ’20th Century

Limited’ passenger train which transported travelers in luxury between New York City and Chicago between the years of 1902 to 1967. Chocolate and citrus are actually fairly common flavor combinations in culinary recipes, and yet many at first glance think this recipe sounds a little unusual. Be assured it is absolutely delicious and don’t give it a second thought, just make it and toast a bygone era when travel used to be something fancy you dressed up for!

Step 1 ADD FORDS GIN

Fill to halfway between 4oz line and 6oz (marked but not numbered) line

Step 2 ADD WHITE CACAO

Fill to the 8oz line

Step 3 ADD LILLET BLANC

Fill to half-way between the 10oz line (marked but not numbered) and the 12oz line

Step 4 ADD LEMON JUICE

Fill to the bottom of the ‘high waist’

Step 5 ADD WATER

Fill to the 20oz line and put the lid on

Serving Instructions Roll bottle end-over-end to mix, taste test & chill.

Take your chilled bottle of 20th Century and shake it hard from end to end, like it’s a cocktail shaker, for 4 to 5 seconds to aerate the drink. Now pour straight into a cocktail glass, garnish with an orange twist and serve.

Aviation

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A citrussy and delicately floral New York classic from 1916 that fell by the wayside, like so many other classic recipes, until the cocktail renaissance of the late 1990s and early 00s. The floral notes from the Creme de Violette can be a little divisive, and the ingredient was even omitted altogether from Harry Craddock’s version in his now legendary Savoy Cocktail Book of 1930.

However, for the Aviation, Violette is very important for the floral note and its delicate purple hue. Interestingly, its demise and subsequent comeback has a slightly different story in the US as it was also down to a complete lack of Creme de Violette between the 1960s and 2007 in the country. This is not to say that US bartenders weren’t making Aviations without Violette – like Craddock – but it was yet another reason why you couldn’t find the original version on menus for so long.

Step 1 ADD WATER

Fill to halfway between 6oz (marked but not numbered) and 8oz line

Step 2 ADD CRÈME DE VIOLETTE

Fill to the 250 line

Step 3 ADD MARASCHINO LIQUEUR

Fill to the 10oz line

Step 4 ADD FORDS GIN

Fill to sit on top of 500ml line

Step 5 ADD LEMON JUICE

Fill to the bottom of the number 20

Step 6 ADD RICH SIMPLE SYRUP

Fill to the 20oz line and put the lid on

Serving Instructions Roll bottle end-over-end to mix, taste test & chill.

Take your chilled bottle of Aviation and shake it hard, like it’s cocktail shaker, from end to end for 4 to 5 seconds to aerate the drink. Now pour the batch straight into a cocktail glass, garnish with a cherry and serve.

Bees Knees

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Born of Prohibition, this simple enduring classic made use of easily available ingredients that may have been used to mask the poor quality of “bath-tub” gins of the time. Interestingly, during Prohibition the best-selling item in the Sears Catalog was Essence of Juniper, suggesting resourceful Americans were finding a way to get their gin fix even through the driest of times.

The Bee’s Knees recipe appeared in a 1934 edition of San Francisco bartender and author Bill Booth by’s cocktail compendium ‘World Drinks and How to Mix Them’.

Today, it’s a simple yet elegant gin libation and is one of the key cocktails that Fords Gin was styled around. The combination of jasmine and honey is as old as the hills and the jasmine flower botanicals used in Fords Gin ensure this cocktail sings.

Step 1 ADD FORDS GIN

Fill to halfway between 6oz (not numbered) & 8oz line

Step 2 ADD HONEY SYRUP (1:1)

Fil to the 10oz (not numbered) line

Step 3 ADD LEMON JUICE

Fill to the top of the measuring line, above the 375ml line

Step 4 ADD WATER

Fill to the 20oz line and put the lid on

Serving Instructions Roll bottle end-over-end to mix, taste test & chill.

Take your chilled bottle of Bees Knees and shake it hard from end to end for 4 to 5 seconds, like it’s cocktail shaker, to aerate the drink. Now pour straight into a cocktail glass, garnish with a lemon twist and serve.

Bramble

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Legendary London bartender Dick Bradsell created the Bramble whilst working at Fred’s Bar in London’s Soho in the 1980s. A well-balanced combination of dry gin, lemon, and creme de mure, the Bramble was intended to be a quintessentially British cocktail inspired by British flavors. It rapidly became the go-to gin drink in many bartenders’ repertoire and arguably propelled gin cocktails back into the limelight. Perhaps the only true “modern classic” cocktail, Dick realised it had nally ascended to the highest of cocktail heights when famously a French bartender argued with him across the bar and refused to believe that he had invented the drink.

“You always have to try and achieve perfection in bartending, it doesn’t just happen; you have to make the effort.” – Dick Bradsell, 2003.

Step 1 ADD WATER

Fill to halfway between 6oz (not numbered) and 8oz line

Step 2 ADD RICH SIMPLE SYRUP

Fill to the 8oz line

Step 3 ADD LEMON JUICE

Fill to the 12oz line

Step 4 ADD FORDS GIN

Fill to the 20oz line and put the lid on

Serving Instructions Roll bottle end-over-end to mix, taste test & chill.

Shake batch in the bottle & pour approx 3 1/2oz or 100ml into glass.

Add crushed ice to the glass, so that it piles up above the rim of the glass.

Drizzle 1⁄2 oz / 15ml Creme de Mure over the ice into the glass.

Garnish with blackberries, and serve.

Corpse Reviver No 2

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Brings back the dead? Well, not quite, but these recipes were designed to revive the drinker as a morning hangover cure! Thankfully this crisp and refreshing little number isn’t restricted to morning imbibing, in fact this classic makes for a delicious aperitif. Like many Prohibition era cocktails, this recipe was all but forgotten for decades, until the resurgence of cocktail culture reached a period in the 00s where research into historical cocktails became very much in vogue, and recipes like this once again became standard knowledge for any bartender worth their salt. Happily so, we’d say.

Step 1 ADD FORDS GIN

Fill to the ‘.’ at the bottom the bottle where it says ‘floz.’

Step 2 ADD LILLET BLANC

Fill to the 6oz line (not numbered)

Step 3 ADD DRY CURAÇAO

Fill to half-way between the 80z line and the 10oz line (marked but not numbered)

Step 4 ADD LEMON JUICE

Fill to the 12oz line

Step 5 ADD ABSINTHE

Add 8 dashes Absinth, or to the top of the 12oz measuring line

Step 6 ADD WATER

Fill to the 20oz line and put the lid on

Serving Instructions Roll bottle end-over-end to mix, taste test & chill.

Take your chilled bottle of Corpse Reviver No2 and shake it hard from end to end for 4 to 5 seconds to aerate the drink. Pour straight into a cocktail glass, garnish with an orange twist and serve.

Earl Grey Martini

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Earl Grey tea is a delicious balance between the earthy notes of black tea and the fragrant citrus notes of bergamot. Typically brewed and served black or with a simple slice of lemon, Earl Grey’s flavor profile is perfect for combining with gin, especially one so well balanced by citrus and earthy botanicals.

The recipe is a delicious riff on a Gin Sour and was created by the legendary New York bartender Audrey Saunders in the early 2000s. Audrey opened the influential Pegu Club cocktail bar in 2005 and helped to drive New York’s cocktail renaissance.

The egg white is left out of the batch and simply added to the shaker with a measure of batch when ready to serve. This also allows those who don’t wish to consume eggs, to either shake a measure of batch without any frothing agent, or simply replace the egg with aquafaba instead.

Step 1 ADD LEMON JUICE

To half-way between 6oz and 8oz Line

Step 2 ADD RICH SIMPLE SYRUP

To 12oz line

Step 3 ADD EARL GREY INFUSED FORDS GIN

Fill to the ‘fill line’ on the neck of the bottle and put the lid on

Serving Instructions Roll bottle end-over-end to mix, taste test & chill.

Add 3oz of batch + 1⁄2oz or 1 small egg white to shaker.

‘Dry Shake’, Shake ingredients without ice – optional to add a Hawthorn Spring to help whip the foam.

Then ‘Wet Shake’ by adding ice to the shaker & the foamy mix, then shake hard again.

Fine strain the mixture into your glass, garnish with a lemon twist and serve.

Gimlet

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Originally a recipe from the British Royal Navy, where gin was added to the ration of Rose’s Lime Cordial taken onboard ship as a somewhat flawed attempt to avoid the ravages of Scurvy, a condition that can be fatal if left untreated. Scurvy is not a disease, but a condition caused by a lack of vitamin C, so the lime cordial was an attempt to get vitamin C into the sailors’ diets, even on long expeditions where fresh ingredients would perish. This popular, Daiquiri style, version drops the lime cordial in favor of a combination of fresh lime juice and sugar. Delivering a crisp and refreshing drink that still manages to make gin the hero.

Step 1 ADD RICH SIMPLE SYRUP

Fill to the point between the ‘m’ and the ‘l’ at the bottom the bottle where it says ‘ml’

Step 2 ADD FORDS GIN

Fill to the 8oz line

Step 3 ADD WATER

Fill to the 500ml line

Step 4 ADD LIME JUICE

Fill to the 20oz line and put the lid on.

Serving Instructions Roll bottle end-over-end to mix, taste test & chill.

Take your chilled bottle of Gimlet and shake it hard, like it’s s cocktail shaker, from end to end for 4 to 5 seconds to aerate the drink. Now pour the batch straight into a cocktail glass, garnish with a lime wedge and serve.

Gin Buck

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A brilliant alternative to a G&T, Bucks are a family of drinks that are not particularly well known by the name ‘Buck’. However, most people have heard of two famous members of the family the Moscow Mule and the Dark n’ Stormy.

The Buck is a simple combination of spirit, fresh citrus, and ginger ale/beer. This version is a deliciously elevated recipe that uses a homemade ginger syrup. The minimal time and effort needed to make the syrup and follow this recipe is well worth it!

Step 1 ADD FORDS GIN

Fill to the top of measuring line 13oz

Step 2 ADD GINGER SYRUP

Fill to 20oz line

Step 3 ADD LIME JUICE

Fill to the ‘fill line’ on the neck of the bottle and put the lid on

Serving Instructions Roll bottle end-over-end to mix, taste test & chill.

Serve at a 2:1 ratio*

2 parts Batch to 1 part Soda.

Fill glass with ice, garnish with candied ginger & lime wheel, and serve.

*For example:

Pour 3oz / 90ml of Gin Buck batch into a glass then add 1.5oz / 45ml Soda water.

Last Word

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The earliest written Last Word recipe dates back to 1916 at the Detroit Athletic Club. It became a somewhat forgotten classic until it was brought back to the cocktail world’s attention in the mid 2000’s. Like the Negroni, it’s an unexpected cocktail hero with its combination of powerful flavors. However, it’s a sweet, sour and herbaceous recipe that creates a truly unique experience and avid fans.

Step 1 ADD FORDS GIN

Fill to the ‘.’ at the bottom the bottle where it says ‘floz.’

Step 2 ADD GREEN CHARTREUSE

Fill to the 6oz line (marked but not numbered)

Step 3 ADD MARASCHINO LIQUEUR

Fill to half-way between the 8oz line and the 10oz line (marked but not numbered)

Step 4 ADD LIME JUICE

Fill to the 12oz line

Step 5 ADD WATER

Fill to the 20oz line and put the lid on.

Serving Instructions Roll bottle end-over-end to mix, taste test & chill.

Take your chilled bottle of Last Word and shake it hard from end to end, like it’s s cocktail shaker, for 4 to 5 seconds to aerate the drink. Now pour straight into a cocktail glass, garnish with a maraschino cherry & lime wheel, and serve.

Limmers Punch

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Derived from the Hindustani word “panch”, meaning “FIve”, punch refers to the elements of sweet, sour, bitter, water and strong which were traditionally mixed in Punch.

Punch was a product of society. A sociable way to enjoy a tipple with company, and would most usually be prepared by servants in the great houses of the British, both at home and throughout the Empire.

The most enduring of Punches evolved into one of gin’s best-known potions, the Tom Collins. Limmer’s Hotel on Conduit Street in central London was a dive bar of its time. The bartender, one John Collins, served a simple mix of gin, lemon juice, sugar, soda and capillaire (an orange flower flavoured syrup). The gin of the time was known as Old Tom so his punch became the Tom Collins and was immortalized in the memoirs of Captain John Gronow.

Step 1 LEMON JUICE

Fill to half way between the top of the ‘floz.’ and 4oz line

Step 2 RICH SIMPLE SYRUP

Fill to half way between 6oz marker and 8oz line

Step 3 ADD FORDS GIN

Fill to the top of the high waist

Step 4 ADD SODA

GENTLY fill to the ‘fill line’ on the neck of the bottle

Step 5 ORANGE FLOWER WATER

Add 2 teaspoons in and put the lid on

Serving Instructions Roll bottle end-over-end to mix, taste test & chill.

Pour your ice-cold Punch mix gently into a punch bowl filled with large chunks or a block of ice, then garnish with lemon wheels. Serve by ladelling the Punch from the bowl into small punch cups filled with ice & garnish (optional, but makes your punch go further).

London Calling

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Created by bartender Chris Jepson at London cocktail institution Milk & Honey in 2002 as a simple twist on a gin sour, this cocktail is the only one to appear on every version of their cocktail menu since.

The addition of dry sherry to a gin sour demonstrates perfectly that a new ingredient can deliver new combinations and truly delicious libations. Light, fresh and quaffable, we think this contemporary cocktail could well be a future inductee to the canon of gin classics.

Step 1 ADD FINO SHERRY

Fill to the top of ‘Z’ of ‘floz’

Step 2 ADD LEMON JUICE

Fill to halfway between 4oz and 6 (Unmarked) line

Step 3 ADD FORDS GIN

Fill to halfway between 10oz and 12oz line

Step 4 ADD RICH SIMPLE SYRUP

Fill to the bottom of the numbers 375

Step 5 ADD WATER

Fill to the 20oz line and put the lid on

Serving Instructions Roll bottle end-over-end to mix, taste test & chill.

Take your chilled bottle of London Calling and shake it hard from end to end for 4 to 5 seconds, like it’s cocktail  shaker, to aerate the drink. Now pour straight into a cocktail glass, garnish with a grapefruit twist and serve.

Original Cocktail

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A move to a more modern, time-sensitive society meant that punch gave way to the cocktail.

The cocktail is generally considered to be an American invention. However, the earliest documented use of the word ‘cock-tail’ appeared in a 1798 publication, The Morning Post & Gazetteer, and was attributed to a politician’s drink tab at a pub on Downing Street.

That politician is named as a Mr. Pitt. William Pitt the Younger who was Prime Minister of Britain from 1783 to 1801. Britain’s youngest ever PM, at the tender age of 24. So it appears the cocktail has its roots firmly in London. The drink was apparently quite common among London’s hostelries and involved mixing gin with ginger syrup, bitters and citrus.

Step 1 ADD WATER

Fill to the 8oz line

Step 2 ADD GINGER SYRUP

Fill to halfway between 10oz (not numbered) and 12oz line

Step 3 ADD DRY CURAÇAO

Fill to bottom of ‘High Waist’

Step 4 ADD FORDS GIN

Fill to the ‘fill line’ on the neck of the bottle and put the lid on

Serving Instructions Roll bottle end-over-end to mix, taste test & chill.

Pour your chilled Original Cocktail into a lowball glass with ice, garnish with lemon & orange twists, and serve.

Pegu Club

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The Pegu Club was the signature cocktail of a social club frequented by British officials, both military and governmental, located just outside of what was then called Rangoon (now Myanmar).

A deliciously refreshing, sharp and complex gin sour recipe that closely resembles the Margarita. It was cemented into the cannon of classic cocktails when it was included by Harry Craddock in his famous 1930 drinks bible, ‘The Savoy Cocktail Book’. Forever im-mortalizing both the drink and the club from which it came.

Step 1 ADD WATER

Fill to 250ml line

Step 2 ADD FORDS GIN

Fill to the middle of the ‘high waist’

Step 3 ADD ORANGE CURAÇAO

Fill to sit on top of the number ‘500’

Step 4 ADD LIME JUICE

Fill to the 20oz line and put the lid on

Serving Instructions Roll bottle end-over-end to mix, taste test & chill.

Take your chilled bottle of Pegu Club and shake it hard from end to end for 4 to 5 seconds, like its cocktail shaker, to aerate the drink. Add a dash of Angostura Bitters to a cocktail glass then pour in the chilled and shaken batched Pegu Club, garnish with a lime twist and serve.

Ramos Gin Fizz

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A legendary recipe for many reasons. Firstly, when made well they’re like drinking a delicious fluffy cloud. Secondly, it’s a recipe born in one of the most enigmatic and historic cocktail cities in the world, New Orleans. More than that, it also seems clear by who and when it was invented. Namely Henry C. Ramos in 1888 at his bar, the Imperial Cabinet Saloon on Gravier Street. A refreshingly straight-forward story.

Most famously, they are supposed to be a pain to make. Originally, they were shaken for between 12 and 15 minutes, yes you did read that correctly. In modern times many bartenders have reduced this time to a mere 30 or 40 seconds. Others have even implemented the use of electric hand whisks to get the job done.

This batch simplifies most of the ingredients into one bottle. A measure of batch is then shaken together with egg white (we recommend both a dry and wet shake, but whatever gets you to that cloud-like consistency works for us). The soda is added directly to the glass in two parts to ensure a good head of foam peaking up above the rim of the glass.

Step 1 ADD LEMON JUICE

Fill to top of ‘floz.’, right to the ‘.’

Step 2 ADD LIME JUICE

Fill to 6oz line

Step 3 ADD RICH SIMPLE SYRUP

Fill to halfway between 8oz and 10oz line

Step 4 ADD HEAVY CREAM

Fill to halfway between ‘High Waist’

Step 5 ADD FORDS GIN

Fill to the ‘fill line’ on the bottle neck

Step 6 ORANGE FLOWER WATER

Add 12 drops to bottle and put the lid on

Serving Instructions Roll bottle end-over-end to mix, taste test & chill.

Add 5oz of batch + 1 small egg white to a shaker. Dry shake (without ice) for 30 seconds, to start to form foam. Then wet shake (with ice) with 2 large ice cubes in the shaker for 5 minutes. Pour mixture into a tall & narrow glass filled with 1oz soda.

Tap the glass on the counter top to settle the foam. Add additional 1oz of soda on top to push foam above the rim, and serve.

Red Snapper

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Today, this simply means a gin version of the Bloody Mary. However, both the Red Snapper and the Bloody Mary have very unclear origins, the Red Snapper was also once listed as the Vodka version we know as the Bloody Mary today! What is clear is that in the years from the mid 1920s to 1940s and beyond, the drink evolved and developed into the spicy number we know today with a variety of alcoholic bases.

Whatever the history, this family of long, savory, spicy drinks are not only some of the world’s most famous cocktails, but also the most adaptable. When serving, we’d recommend a good selection of garnishes and a bottle of Worcestershire sauce and Tabasco on hand for guests to tweak and finish their serve to their liking.

Step 1 ADD TOMATO JUICE

Fill to the 500ml line

Step 2 ADD LEMON JUICE

Fill to just clear above the number 500

Step 3 ADD WORCESTERSHIRE SAUCE

Fill to just above the halfway point between 500ml & 20oz

Step 4 ADD ALL OTHER SEASONING

Add a large pinch salt, large pinch black pepper and dashes of Tabasco to taste (go light to allow other guests to add more to their preference)

Step 5 ADD FORDS GIN

Fill to the ‘fill line’ on the neck of the bottle and put the lid on

Serving Instructions Roll bottle end-over-end to mix, taste test & chill.

Pour your ice cold Red Snapper straight from the bottle into a tall glass, adjust spicing if required to individual taste. Fill glass with ice, garnish with an array of pickles and celery or as preferred, and serve.

Gin Rickey

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The Gin Rickey was originally created for Colonel Joe Rickey at Shoomaker’s Saloon in Washington, DC around 1880, using Bourbon, not the more commonly made gin version we know and love today.

Whether it was Rickey’s recipe or bartender George Williamson’s, we may never know. Either way the concept was simple, create a long and refreshing cocktail to keep cool in the hot summer months.

The key difference with the Rickey is the complete lack of sugar or sweetening agent. Balance is instead achieved by adding more soda water than used in similar long drinks like the Tom Collins, to soften the acidic punch without the need for a sweetening ingredient.

Step 1 ADD FORDS GIN

Fill to the 6oz Line

Step 2 ADD LIME JUICE

Fill to the 8oz Line

Step 3 ADD SODA

GENTLY fill to the ‘fill line’ on the neck of the bottle and put the lid on

Serving Instructions Roll bottle end-over-end to mix, taste test & chill.

Pour your ice-cold Rickey batch gently into a tall glass with ice, garnish with a lime wedge and serve.

Singapore Sling

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A fruity yet refreshing variation on the classic Gin Sling. A sling is more of a concept than a drink, with a huge number of possible variations. The most famous recipe is claimed by the Raffles Hotel in Singapore and is said to have been created for a cocktail competition by bartender Ngiam Tong Boom.

A sweet, bright pink concoction, it was based on the Straits Sling, an altogether more refined and dryer drink.

However, the Singapore Sling is the drink that endured on cocktail menus through the years when gin passed, temporarily, out of vogue.

Step 1 ADD CHERRY LIQUEUR

Fill to space between ‘m’ & ‘l’ of ‘ml’

Step 2 ADD LIME JUICE

Fill to the top of ‘floz.’ the ‘.’

Step 3 ADD PINEAPPLE JUICE

Fill to the 8oz Line

Step 4 ADD BÉNÉDICTINE

Fill to halfway between 8oz and 10oz (not numbered) line

Step 5 ADD FORDS GIN

Fill to bottom of the ‘high waist’

Step 6 ADD WATER

Fill to 20oz line and put the lid on

Serving Instructions Roll bottle end-over-end to mix, taste test & chill.

Add a dash of Angostura bitters to your glass with 1 1⁄2oz / 45ml club soda. Shake the bottle of batched recipe hard, then add 5oz / 150ml of the batch to the glass to combine with the soda & bitters. Fill with ice, garnish with pineapple & cherry, and serve.

Southside

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A bright and fresh drink that, like many of the classics, has a number of potential origin stories. Was it mixed for mobsters in the Southside of Chicago, or was it first mixed in Long Island’s Southside Sportsmen’s Club? What we do know is that the very similar Southside Fizz recipe was recorded in print by 1916 in Huge Enslinn’s book “Recipes for Mixed Drinks”.

This longer version (lengthened with club soda and mixed with both lemon and lime juices) is still served to this day in New York’s 21 Club where so many have been served since its opening in 1922, helping to cement the recipe’s place in history. However, it’s not a contender for the creation of the recipe itself. Whatever its roots, and however you prefer it served, this is one of the all-time great classic cocktails, and a true crowd pleaser.

The mint leaves are kept out of the batch here for simplicity and to ensure consistency from serve to serve. Therefore, each measure of batch is shaken with ice and fresh mint leaves, then fine strained into a cocktail glass, before garnishing and serving.

Step 1 ADD LIME JUICE

Fill to the 6oz line

Step 2 ADD RICH SIMPLE SYRUP

Fill to the 10oz line

Step 3 ADD FORDS GIN

Fill to the ‘fill line’ on the neck of the bottle and put the lid on

Serving Instructions Roll bottle end-over-end to mix, taste test & chill.

Add 3 1⁄2 oz batch to a cocktail shaker with 6 mint leaves and ice, then shake hard. 

Fine strain into a cocktail glass, garnish with a sprig of mint and serve.

N.B. There’s no need to muddle the mint leaves before shaking. Mint leaves are incredibly delicate and release their flavors easily. The process of shaking with ice is more than enough agitation to release the flavors into the drink.

Tom Collins

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Likely originating from Limmer’s Punch, the signature recipe of London’s Limmer’s Hotel, written by bartender John Collins. The recipe is what we know today as a Tom Collins, except for the serve size and the use of Capillaire, a sugar syrup flavored with orange flower water.

With such a similar recipe and a man called Collins as its creator, there’s a good chance this is the origin of the Tom Collins cocktail, yet little is ever certain in cocktail history.

Another famous use of the name Tom Collins was ‘The Great Tom Collins Hoax of 1874’. Throughout New York and Philadelphia, a joke went viral about a man, Tom Collins, who didn’t even exist. The game was to turn to a stranger, in a bar perhaps, and ask if they knew Tom Collins. When the stranger replied ‘no’, you would explain that they should find him because he’s been spreading all sorts of stories around town about you! Newspapers reported on the hoax and even spread false stories of their own to join in on the fun. However, it’s hard to find a solid link between the viral hoax and a tall refreshing citrussy gin drink!

Step 1 ADD FORDS GIN

Fill to the 500ml line

Step 2 ADD RICH SIMPLE SYRUP

Fill to the 20oz line

Step 3 ADD LEMON JUICE

Fill to the ‘fill line’ on the neck of the bottle and put the lid on

Serving Instructions Roll bottle end-over-end to mix, taste test & chill.

Serve at a 2:1 ratio*

2 parts batch to 1 part Soda

Fill glass with ice, garnish with a cherry and lemon wheel, and serve.

*For example:

Pour 3oz / 90ml of Tom Collins batch into a glass then add 1.5oz / 45ml Soda water.

Vesper Martini

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The Vesper is the Martini recipe variation made famous by James Bond, it first appeared in Ian Fleming’s 1953 novel Casino Royal. The combination of gin, vodka and Kina Lillet was ordered by Bond to be shaken, and became one of his most recognized lines from the movie adaptations – “Shaken not Stirred”. There are many legends of how the recipe came to Flemming, from a friend’s butler who served the combination at a dinner while he was staying at his Jamaican estate Goldeneye, where he was writing. To simply overhearing the recipe being called for in his favorite watering hole, Duke’s Hotel bar in London. Whatever the true source of the recipe, Flemming was a fan of blending fact with fiction in his Novels. The names of two of Bond’s most famous villains came from an architect who’s style he disliked, Erno Goldfinger and his nemesis from school (and father of famous cricket commentator) Thomas Blofeld!

Step 1 ADD FORDS GIN

Fill to the 10oz line (marked but not numbered)

Step 2 ADD LILLET BLANC

Fill to the 12oz line

Step 3 ADD VODKA

Fill to the middle of the ‘high waist’

Step 4 ADD WATER

Fill to the ‘fill line’ on the neck of the bottle and put the lid on.

Serving Instructions Roll bottle end-over-end to mix, taste test & chill.

Pour your ice cold Vesper Martini straight from the bottle into a cocktail glass.
Garnish to preference with lemon twist or olive.

White Lady

Batch It

A deliciously short and sharp cocktail that dates back to the 1920s, then further popularized by being included in Harry Craddock’s 1930 ‘The Savoy Cocktail Book’.

A gin-based Sidecar (hence it’s also been known as a Chelsea Sidecar), that has been made with and without egg white over the years. The inclusion of the egg white adds a silky and fluffy texture to the crisp dry liquid content of the recipe. Both aredelicious, it’s simply a question of preference.

To allow the batch to keep longer, the egg white is omitted from the recipe at the batching stage. This also gives you the choice of whether or not you want to shake egg white or a foaming substitute into your final cocktail. So, you can make it just as you like it.

Step 1 ADD LEMON JUICE

Fill to the 6 oz line

Step 2 ADD DRY CURAÇAO

Fill to the 12oz line

Step 3 ADD RICH SIMPLE SYRUP

Fill to top of measuring line, above 375ml

Step 4 ADD FORDS GIN

Fill to the ‘fill line’ on the neck of the bottle and put the lid on

Serving Instructions Roll bottle end-over-end to mix, taste test & chill.

Add 3oz of batch + 1⁄2oz or 1 small egg white to shaker and ‘Dry Shake’. Shake ingredients without ice – optional to add a Hawthorn Spring to help whip the foam. Then ‘Wet Shake’ by adding ice to the shaker & the foamy mix, then shake hard again. Fine strain the mixture into your glass, and serve.

Gin and Tonic

Batch It

The G&T is a classic highball cocktail that has its roots in medical treatment. The bitter notes of tonic, loved by G&T drinkers, comes from quinine. This is the active ingredient found in the bark of the Cinchona tree that prevents Malaria. Originally discovered in South America, Cinchona seeds and plants were shipped across the world to India and Java through the 1850s and first half of the 1860s, where plantations were created.

Quinine was consumed by mixing with all sorts of spirits, whatever was local or available, or sparkling water. The next step towards the G&T was the creation of ‘Tonic Water’ in Islington London in 1858. It would take another ten years until there was a written record of the G&T.

According to the world famous Kew Gardens,nwhich played a key role in the transplantation of Cinchona trees, the Oriental Sporting Magazine reported that partygoers were ordering the G&Ts in Lucknow, India at the end of a horse race.

Step 1 ADD FORDS GIN

Fill to halfway between 6oz and 8oz

Step 2 ADD TONIC

GENTLY fill to the ‘fill line’ on the neck of the bottle and put the lid on

Serving Instructions Roll bottle end-over-end to mix, taste test & chill.

Pour your ice cold G&T mix gently into a tall glass with ice, garnish with a lemon wedge and serve.

Stamp with text "The Fords Gin Co. Dry Gin, Gin Made For Cocktails"

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